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PNP, film industry join hands vs. film piracy

By Abigail Kwok
INQUIRER.net
First Posted 15:16:00 08/09/2010

Filed Under: Cinema, Entertainment (general), Police

MANILA, Philippines ? The Philippines is known to be one of the sources of film pirates, an official from the Motion Picture of America disclosed on Monday.

Michael Robinson, senior vice president for content protection and chief of operations of MPA, said that in 2009, 90 percent of all counterfeit movies were created through camcording devices that were sneaked into cinemas.

Of this number, nine percent were found to have originated in the Philippines as well as in other southeast Asian countries.

Robinson said that worldwide, the film industry loses $18 billion due to piracy, leading to revenue loss and also job loss.

"That's why stopping film piracy is very important," he said.

With this, authorities and leaders in the film industry joined hands on Monday vowing to put a stop to film piracy through strict implementation of the Anti-Camcording Law.

Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Jesus Verzosa and leaders of the film industry led the signing of a memorandum of agreement against film piracy.

The PNP has been designated as the lead agency in enforcing Republic Act 10088 or the Anti-Camcording Act of 2010.

The law prohibits and penalizes the unauthorized use, possession and control of audiovisual recording devices to transmit or copy a film or other works.

The law also prohibits recording in film theaters, even if it will be used for private viewing.

"With the law in place and the entire industry collaborating to ensure the law is upheld, the PNP is confident that the country will achieve success in its bid to minimize and eventually eradicate film piracy," Verzosa said.

Section 7 of the law states that cinemas and other facilities where movies are shown are now required to display notices and signages to warn the public of the consequences of camcording.

The law also allows authorized individuals to seize and detain, even without warrant, persons found to be illegally recording the film.

Persons found guilty of violating the law will be fined between P50,000 to P750,000 and imprisoned a maximum of six years.

Atty. Joji Alonso, legal counsel of the Motion Picture Anti-Film Piracy Council, also urged the public to report to authorities any film pirates.

"While we, along with distributors, local producers, exhibitors and the PNP, are prepared to take the necessary action against illegal camcording syndicates, we also hope that the public will play a part by reporting illegal camcording incidents to cinema staff or authorities," she said.



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